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Critical Thinking Through Reading And Writing Dlsu

Course Descriptions


 



CHED-Mandated General Education Courses (51 units)

BUSANA1             Business Analysis 1

3 units
This course covers theories of investment mathematics and their applications to commerce and economics. This course also introduces students to rudiments of the mathematics of finance through the use of present value analysis, simple and effective interest, discounted cash flow, and internal rate of return for decision making.

Pre-requisite: COMALGE



COMALGE          College Algebra
3 units
This 3-unit course on College Algebra is specifically designed for Business and Economics students to provide them with a solid and working knowledge of pre-Calculus Algebra.  The course tackles the real number of system, polynomials, algebraic fractions and radicals, functions and relations, systems of equations and their respective applications to business and economic situations.

Prerequisite – None



ENGLCOM          Basic Communication and Study Skills
3 units
This is a foundational course that equips freshman students with the necessary academic reading, writing, and viewing skills needed to become multi-literate and autonomous learners, and engaged citizens in the 21st century.  As the first of two components of the English One program (the other one being ENGLCOM-RVLC or Reading, Viewing and Language Component) and the first GE English course in the students’ curriculum, ENGLCOM-WC is anchored on transformative as well as self-directed learning frameworks.

Prerequisite: None



ENGLRES            Basic Research Skills / English For Specific Purpose
3 units
This course aims to teach students to apply reading and writing skills necessary in conducting research. It also enhances the critical thinking skills required in academic research writing/communication of a particular field (Business, Computer Science, Liberal Arts, Education, Science, and Engineering).

Prerequisite: ENGLCOM



FILDLAR             Pagbasa at Pagsulat sa Iba't-Ibang Disiplina
3 units
The course focuses on the development of the analytical and critical skills of the students in reading and writing for academic and professional communication requirements with consideration of other language register.  Students are taught the different paraphrasing techniques and reading strategies that go beyond literal translation through the use of written textual genre (as well as audio/visual) or from various language usage in the fields of humanities, social science and communication, science and technology, and the profession.  To serve as models are various reading materials on how to conduct research papers and other scholarly essays.

Prerequisite: FILKOMU



FILKOMU            Komunikasyon sa Filipinohiya
3 units
The course focuses on the more advanced use of the Filipino language in discussing the five macro discourses of Philippine Studies which have been designed for an individual to know and understand oneself and appreciate one’s national identity, culture, and society.  The general objective of the course is for every Lasallian student to acquire competence in communication in the five discourses of  Filipinology in an academic context.

Prerequisite – None



GREATWK          The Great Works
3 units
The course is designed to center on a theme built around three Great Works from various cultures/disciplines that have exerted influence on the way human beings think about themselves in relation to the world. The course will be taught by a team of three teacher-facilitators who will rotate every four weeks in three classes. Each teacher will facilitate the reading and discussion of one work. Towards the end of the term, the teachers will meet as a team with all the students of the three classes in sessions that will serve to integrate the discussions on the three Great Works. Through the course, students are given a venue to participate in multidisciplinary discourses on how a particular Great Work "reads" or "thinks through" the human problems with new perspectives and paradigms.

Prerequisite: None



HUMAART          Introduction to Art
3 units
This course is an introduction to the elements and principles of art (music, dance, architecture, sculpture, painting, and film) through a critical examination of the major art works, movements and styles in the Philippines and the world.  It is principally a study of arts as processes of the creative imagination in dynamic interaction with its multi-faceted worlds.

To enable the students to appreciate the arts, the course will foreground the study of the arts and their elements on a story of how the basic human impetus to express oneself in enduring forms of beauty is born out of the struggle of the spirit on the day-to-day level.  The arts provide the tangible and intangible examples of the magnificence of the human spirit which ennoble the mind and the heart of the beholder.  And it is one’s awareness of the monuments of the human spirit’s magnificence that opens the way for a student’s life-long and deepening intimacy with the arts.

Prerequisite: ENGLRES



HUMALIT          Introduction to Literature
3 units
Introduction to Literature is a foundational course that introduces students to literary forms of genres (fiction, poetry, drama) through the study of selected literary texts from various countries and historical periods.  Students will be guided through the development of a personal framework for the analysis, appreciation, and assessment of literature.

Prerequisite: None



INTFILO              Introductory Philosophy

3 units
Philosophy,  both as a way of life and an academic discipline, examines and understands the fundamental questions about the world and human life, seeks answers to these questions, and applies the answers to daily living.  It also examines the basis upon which beliefs are held, and explodes possible interconnections among various fields of knowledge.  This course shall introduce students to the ideas of some of the world’s greatest philosophers, which have shaped the way in which human beings think and live.  Consequently, this foundational philosophy course shall hone their skills in philosophical reasoning.

Prerequisite: None



KASPIL1              Buhay, mga sinulat at nagawa ni Dr. Jose P. Rizal
3 units
This is a foundational course.  The critical study and review of the life, writings, and achievements of Dr. Jose Rizal is a historical examination.  The course also discusses the Spanish colonialism in the Philippines with emphasis in the 19th century during the time of Dr. Jose Rizal.  The course is in compliance with the provisions set forth in the Rizal Law (R.A 1425, 1956) that aims to respond to the need of engendering and strengthening the spirit of nationalism in the life of the student.

Prerequisite: None



KASPIL2              Kasaysayan ng Pilipinas
3 units
This course is a critical study of the history of the Philippines and its political, economic, social and cultural institutions from its birth up to the present as viewed under a Filipino perspective.  This course discusses the development of the nation and the challenges that if faced at every significant chapter of its history.  The course aims to inculcate in students the lessons learned from history and how these lessons can provide solution to the issues presently confronting the country.

Prerequisite: KASPIL1



LBYMATB           G.E. Natural Science New Materials Track - Biology Laboratory
1 unit
This is a laboratory course designed to help students appreciate and understand this exciting field by guiding them through the scientific underpinnings of modern biotechnology, giving them a grasp of the basic concepts and principles, and enabling them to be at pace with this rapidly evolving technology. This is brought about by the recent progress and cutting-edge breakthroughs in the field of biotechnology which have revolutionized our understanding of life processes and have led to innovations, practical applications, and improvement in the ways by which we utilize living organisms to meet human needs.

Prerequisite :  none



LBYMATC           G.E. Natural Science New Materials Track - Chemistry Laboratory

1 unit
The laboratory component of SCIMATC will expand understanding of the lecture topics by providing the students with an experience of scientific knowledge acquisition. Activities include hands-on experiments, demonstrations and inter class debates.

Prerequisite :  none




POLISCI         Introduction to Political Science

3 units
This is an introductory course to the study of politics, and its accompanying institutions, the state and government.  It attempts to build on the students’ prior knowledge and questions on politics, and then seeks to describe and explain them by providing real-life examples.  Hence, the course offers a thematic, problem-oriented and learner-centered treatment of political science that seeks to educate to participate.

Politics is defined as the process of choosing among different values with the state and government as the structures by which polity works with or towards the chosen values.  The features and characteristics of this process are important, affecting the types and magnitudes of issues that different societies face at the local, national, regional, and global levels.  In this course, students are exposed to how political scientists attempt to systematically analyze various political phenomena.  Emphasis is placed on equipping students with introductory theories, concepts, and approaches in political science and governance.  The ultimate goal is to enable students to develop a more informed and critical view of historical and contemporary socio-political issues in the Philippines, the region, and the world.

Prerequisite: None



SCIMATB             G.E. Natural Science New Materials Track - Biology Lecture
1 unit
This is a course designed to help students appreciate and understand this exciting field by guiding them through the scientific underpinnings of modern biotechnology, giving them a grasp of the basic concepts and principles, and enabling them to be at pace with this rapidly evolving technology. This is brought about by the recent progress and cutting-edge breakthroughs in the field of biotechnology which have revolutionized our understanding of life processes and have led to innovations, practical applications and improvement in the ways by which we utilize living organisms to meet human needs.

Prerequisite: None



SCIMATC            G.E. Natural Science New Materials Track - Chemistry Lecture
1 unit
This course is designed to provide an understanding of general chemical principle by following the current development in material sciences; plastics and polymers; synthesis, design and delivery of drugs; household products; food and nutrition; and genetic engineering. Chemical concepts that will be covered include atomic theory; bonding and polymerization; molecular geometry and isomerism; organic chemistry and functional groups; intermolecular forces of attraction; food components; carbohydrates, fats and proteins; caloric intake; and DNA and the chemistry of heredity.

Prerequisite: None



SCIMATP             G.E. Natural Science New Materials Track - Physics Lecture
2 units
This is a General Education (GE) course on new materials used in modern technologies designed for students in the College of Computer Studies (CCS), College of Education (CED), College of Liberal Arts (CLA), College of Business, and School of Economics (SOE).  The course provides the students with an insight on the structure, properties, processing, and performance of new materials.  Misconceptions on the different topics will be drawn out, sorted, and resolved through the various hands-on activities and group discussion.  The course utilizes the students’ imagination, intuition, and creativity in analyzing and discovering the various laws and principles that govern the physical world.

Prerequisite: None



THMATIC            Integrated Social Science (See Table 1)
3 units
This is an integrating course where the APC student chooses from among the CLA courses offered for integration:  INTSOCI (Introduction to Sociology) or INTHROP (Introduction to Anthropology) or NTROPSY (Introduction to Psychology).

Prerequisite: None

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Lasallian General Education Courses

TREDONE           Humanity's Search for Life
3 units
This course develops in students the skills for religious respect and tolerance, dialogue and unity, as they open themselves into inter-religious and ecumenical dialogue.  This dialogue and sharing of spiritual gifts from the great traditions in turn show the way to promoting justice, peace, and integrity of creation.

In this course, the students discern the role that faith plays in their lives as they grapple with the questions and concerns on the meaning of life.  As the course looks at the distinctiveness of Christianity and its different faith expressions, students are led to discover and critically appreciate the life-giving roots exemplified in their own beliefs, norms, and rituals.  They deepen their understanding of the meaning of life by recognizing the truth, goodness, and beauty found in the different religious traditions.

Prerequisite: None



TREDTWO          The Filipino Christian in a Changing World
3 units
This course develops students as persons in communities of moral discernment.  The Filipino-Christian living in a rapidly changing world is confronted with challenges and alternative lifestyles which demand proper discernment, evaluation, and decision.

Prerequisite: TREDONE



TREDTRI                   The Christian and the World
3 units
The course is a journey into Sacred Scriptures as a locus of encounter with JESUS, THE LIVING WORD.  The students read and reflect on the bible as God’s revelation or personal communication, develop the skills in biblical analysis and personally reflect on the life of Jesus.  The course empowers the students to live and promote the Gospel values of justice, peace, and care of creation in their lives and in their communities.  Concretely, students immerse into communities in need of help in the catechetical ministry.

Prerequisite: TREDTWO



TREDFOR            The Christian Vocation of Life
3 units
The course develops in the student the disposition and knowledge in discerning Christian life as a response of faith to the invitation to an unconditional offer of life and love (the Kingdom of God).  The course focuses on marriage and family life as a response and commitment to follow Jesus.  After exploring God’s call as vocation in Module 1, its implication for the marital commitment will be discussed in Modules 2 and 3.  The characteristics, relational means of the marital commitment, and the meaning of being and becoming family will be treated in Module 4.  Priesthood, religious life, and single life will also be discussed in Module 5 as other ways of responding to God’s call.

Prerequisite: TREDTRI



FTDANCE            Physical Fitness and Wellness in Dance
2 units
This course introduces the students to the fundamental step patterns of simple to intricate variations of selected classic ballroom /dance sport dances, some folk/foreign dances, other contemporary modern/ poi/ pop dances. It also encourages the students to choreograph their own dance variations. In this course the students can express their feelings or emotions through movement disciplined by rhythm. Dance etiquette, health and safety in dancing, posture and body mechanics are also included together with other concepts of fitness other than performance and health related fitness.

Prerequisite: FITWELL



FTTEAMS            Physical Fitness and Wellness in Team Sports
2 units
This course is a basic course in basketball that equips students with the necessary skills needed to become an offensive/defensive team member in basketball.

This course further develops fundamental skills learned in basketball through awareness of movement/actions and factors that influence a player to move intelligently and safely on the court.  Application of discipline-specific, scientific, and theoretical concepts critical to the development of strategies, techniques, and the use of proper body mechanics will be strictly observed through safety performance while actively participating in drills/activities in order to become well informed and engaged basketball players.

Prerequisite – FITWELL



FITWELL             Physical Fitness and Wellness
2 units
This course is a soft pre-requisite course to all the succeeding Physical Education and rhythm activities. Every student will submit to the rigors and protocol of each Health-related fitness test components. Test results will help students understand their current fitness status, identify the risk, empower them to take responsibility for lifestyle decision, and inspire them to embrace the opportunity to make positive lifestyle choices.  Each fitness component will be discussed every meeting to enlighten students on the facts, issues, controversies, and myths surrounding each topic. Active participation in the mastery of the aerobic mass demo routine and creation for the presentation of a creative aerobic routine from the basic rhythmic step patterns in the inter-class competition is required.

Prerequisite – none



PERSEF1              Personal Effectiveness 1
(2) units
The Lasallian Core Curriculum of the DLSU–Manila aims at developing a whole person who embodies the Lasallian values and demonstrates professional skills as well as personal competencies. This individual is mature in all aspects of his/her person, with a nationalistic and humanistic outlook and a carefully reasoned faith.

PERSEF1 is a foundational course in the Lasallian Core Curriculum, taken by all students in their first year. It provides the information and skills that they need as they blend into college life. The course covers basic topics in each of the 5 themes of total personal development, designed to complement their academic and spiritual growth. These themes will be further explored in the 2 other Personal Effectiveness courses which the students will take in later years.

Prerequisite: None



PERSEF2              Personal Effectiveness 2
(2) units
The Lasallian Core Curriculum of the DLSU–Manila aims at developing a whole person who embodies the Lasallian values and demonstrates professional skills as well as personal competencies. This individual is mature in all aspects of his/her person, with a nationalistic and humanistic outlook and a carefully reasoned faith.

PERSEF2 is a formative course in the Lasallian Core Curriculum, taken by students in their 2nd or 3rd year, before they take their practicum courses. It focuses on their preparation for entry into the world of work. It is based on the theory that career is a developmental process that starts in childhood and goes on through life. One’s career development is thus affected by, and affects, one’s physical, socio–psychological, spiritual and cognitive development. The topics of the various sessions revolve around the same 5 themes of total personal development, which were covered in PERSEF1, but take on a different level with emphasis on career development.

Prerequisite: PERSEF1



IPERSEF             Integrating Course on Personal Effectiveness
0 units
This course integrates what the students have learned and internalized during the first and second personal effectiveness courses. 

Prerequisites: PERSEF2, LASARE3



LASARE1             Lasallian Recollection 1
(0) units
This one-day recollection for first year students focuses on the development of the Lasallian core values of faith, zeal for service, and communion in mission among the participants.  Using passages from the Sacred Scriptures and references to the Lasallian founding story, LASARE1 invites each of the participants to (1) recognize and appreciate their inherent goodness and giftedness in the context of being created in the image and likeness of God, (2) explore ways by which they can enhance and share their gifts to their respective communities, and (3) identify a concrete community service project by which they can actualize the value or working together in a mission to serve those in need.  The synthesizing point for all the activities of this one-day recollection is the call to be “Ambassadors of God” or to be the visible signs of faith, hope, and God’s love in this world.

Prerequisite: None



LASARE2             Lasallian Recollection 2
(0) units
LASARE2 is a one–day recollection for second year students which intends to deepen the Lasallian Core Values of Faith, Zeal for Service and Communion in Mission among the participants by helping them become more aware of their calling. The program will provide an opportunity for the participants to understand what “calling” is and its principles; to be moved to respond to the greater reality beyond them; to identify their gifts and passions that will enable them to respond to their calling; and to express in writing how God is calling them in their present reality. At the end of the recollection, the participants are challenged to make their individual “mission statement” or a definition of their “life’s work” which manifests how they have integrated the Lasallian Core Values in their lives.

Prerequisite: LASARE1



LASARE3             Lasallian Recollection 3
(0) units
The Integrating Lasallian Retreat (LASARET) is an overnight off-campus spiritual development activity for graduating students, aimed at nurturing in them a deep sense of purpose and mission.  The retreat hopes that the students will be able to identify possible contributions and personal responses to the Gospel invitation of building God’s Kingdom or to the Lasallian vision of forming “Achievers for God and Country.”

Prerequisite: LASARE2



NSTP101               NSTP General Orientation
(0) units
This non-academic course introduces the student to the general overview of the NSTP and CWTS, whose goals are to encourage the student/youth to contribute in nation building and in the improvement of the general welfare and the quality of life of local marginalized communities.

Prerequisite: None



NSTPCW1/LT1             NSTP- Community Service 1/Literacy Training Service 1
(3) units
The Formation Phase (CW1) is the first stage of the CWTS component of the NSTP. Under CW1, the capabilities of students to provide services to marginalized and deprived communities are enhanced through classroom sessions and field exposure.

This non-academic course accomplishes its objectives through classroom sessions to equip students with basic knowledge, skills, and attitude needed in community service.  The knowledge obtained by the students through lectures is applied through a two-day exposure in a poor community and submission of an action plan.

Prerequisite: NSTP101



NSTPCW2/LT2          NSTP- Community Service 1/Literacy Training Service 2
(3) units
The NSTPCW2 is the second and final phase of the CWTS component of NSTP. Under CW2, students are given the opportunity to implement projects in partnership with local marginalized and deprived communities by way of actual community work through implementation and completion of short-term projects (e.g. literacy, resource mobilization, advocacy) that will benefit a partner community.  The student is expected to submit term-end community project report.

Prerequisite: NSTPCW1



SAS1000               Student Affairs Services 1000
(0) units
This course covers initial interview and personality test for the freshmen students.

Prerequisite: none

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College Courses

ACCTBA1            Fundamentals of Accounting
3 units
This course ACCTBA1, FUNDAMENTALS OF ACCOUNTING is designed to develop a basic understanding of the conceptual framework underlying the measurement and communication of financial data for business decisions as well as their relevance in the national context. This course emphasizes on how economic decision makers use the accounting information found in financial statements and why these information are vital in the operation of every enterprise. It deals with analyzing, and processing business transactions commonly engaged by a sole proprietor of a service and merchandising business.

Pre-requisite: None



ACCTBA2            Accounting for Partnership and Corporation
3 units
The course ACCTBA2, Accounting for Partnership and Corporation, deals with transactions, financial statements and problems peculiar to the operations of partnerships and corporations as distinguished from the sole proprietorship. Special topic on book value per share and earnings per share are also included.

Pre-requisite: ACCTBA1



ACCTBA3            Fundamentals of Accounting 3
3 units
Fundamentals of Accounting III (ACCTBA3).  This course is a basic course that combines the knowledge of management practice and makes use of accounting information for decision-making. It introduces the use of financial statements to actual relevant day-to-day management activities. The course exposes students to the preparation of internal reports tailor-fitted for management decision-making. The planning and controlling functions of management are emphasized through accounting and mathematical techniques that will allow for informed judgment.

Prerequisite: ACCTBA2



BASFIN1              Basic Financial Management 1
3 units
The course covers complex aspects of financial decisions such as medium to long term investments, capital budgeting under uncertainty, debt versus equity financing, cost of capital, dividend decisions, valuation, and stock options/warrants It will also provide the students with a review of the basic principles, techniques, and analytical tools needed in conducting financial analysis using commonly-used financial statements, in evaluating and forecasting a business firm's financial performance (cash flows and ratio analysis). Risk and rates of return, including valuation of bonds and stocks will also be discussed. These concepts are applied to financial and non-financial enterprises.

Pre-requisite: ACCTBA2



BASFIN2              Basic Financial Management 2
3 units
This course is a follow up and extension to Basic Financial Management 1 and is designed to address a variety of advanced topics and tools that build on much of the material taken up in the aforesaid course. The student will learn to create, execute and analyze working capital management strategies; evaluate and make financial decisions on various leasing opportunities, value options and contingent claims and use these frameworks to incorporate management decisions into financial models; understand and manage corporate governance frameworks and issues and lastly; situate financial management in the broader context of the Philippine banking system. The course will teach specific tools using the case method, exercises and online tutorials. This is a demanding course that requires a lot of work.

Pre-requisite: BASFIN1



BUSLAW1            Law on Obligations, Contracts, Sales and other Business Contracts
3 units
Obligations and Contract (BUSLAW1). Provides an understanding of the basic concepts and principles of law in general. A student learns his/her rights and obligations in relation to acts and omissions, thereby reinforcing the value of keeping contractual and legal obligations in the development of a more socially responsible person.

Prerequisite: None



BUSLAW2            Law on Business Organizations (Partnerhip, Corporations and other Business Organizations)
3 units
Law on Business Organizations (Partnership, Corporations and Other Business Organizations) (BUSLAW2). This course will focus on the legal requirements for the formation of partnerships and corporations as juridical entities, their powers, management, and dissolution. The rights and liabilities of the members composing the business organization, whether as partners, stockholders, officers, or directors, are also studied. Important judicial doctrines in corporate law are also tackled in this course.

Prerequisite: BUSLAW1



BUSLAW3            Principles of Taxation, Income and other Transfer and Business Taxes
3 units
Principles of Taxation, Income and Other Transfer and Business Taxes (BUSLAW3). The course is principally a study of the basic principles of Taxation, Income Taxation, Estate and Donor’s taxes and the different business and transfer taxes imposed under the National Internal Revenue Code (NIRC). The first part is aimed at situating Taxation as a law in the context of the Philippine legal system and introduces the student to the concept of Taxation and its significance as a State Power. It also seeks to thoroughly acquaint the student with the general principles of Taxation. The second part is primarily devoted to the study of the concept of Income and Income Taxation; business taxes specifically, Value-Added Tax (VAT), as well as other business taxes namely: excise taxes, other percentage taxes, documentary stamp taxes, and community tax certificate.

Prerequisite: BUSLAW1



CONADEV           Contemporary National and Economic Development
3 units
This Contemporary National Development (CONADEV) course is designed as an introduction to the multidimensional aspects of the development process and the practical problems or issues involved in boosting the rate of economic growth in low-income countries. The course will discuss the economic growth models and the critical analysis of these models in the context of developing country experience. 

Key socio-economic issues will be highlighted focusing on key theories, economic debates, and pragmatic insights. The course is intended to create awareness about the development process in least developed (LDCs) and developed countries (DCs) as well as their social, economic and moral implications. Discussion will include similarities and differences.  Reference to Philippine development experience will be made throughout the course.

Prerequisite - ECONTWO



CPROBS1             Critical Problem Solving 1
3 units
This is a three-unit course which provides business students with necessary skills in decision making anchored on the science of quantification. This covers then judicious use of business information from the internal and external loci of the organization as bases in making informed business decisions. Emphasis is made on critically solving business problems through practical applications of quantitative data, descriptive tools for data analysis and the methodology for developing hypotheses and constructing inferences about ever changing and dynamic nature of the business environment.

Prerequisite:    COMALGE



CPROBS2             Critical Problem Solving 2
3 units
This is a three-unit course which exposes business students to the general principles of operations management amplified by the use of some quantitative tools in solving business problems as fundamental elements scientific management. This course will delve on familiarizing students with operation strategies and production systems with technology integration as applied in various industry forms and scales. Heuristic and non-quatitative procedures dealing with operational problems are both covered in this course with much attention on the ecological implications of operations decisions such as the opportunities that exists for companies in increase profits by designing products and production process and managing operations in an environmentally sound manner.

Prerequisite:    CPROBS1



ECONONE           Basic Microeconomics
3 units
The course aims to give an understanding and appreciation of the basic theories and concepts in economics and their application to current national and international economic concerns.  The focus of the course is on the economic activities of individual decision-making units in society, specifically households and firms.  Consumer choice is examined using demand theory and an evaluation of the economic behavior of firms is conducted using the theory of production and cost and how it behaves under different market structures.   A general understanding of welfare economics caps the course, placing all theories learned within a simple appreciation of a general equilibrium framework.

Pre-requisite: COMALGE




ECONTWO        Introduction to Macroeconomics
3 units
Introduction to Macroeconomics is a basic course for students under the College of Business as well as the School of Economics.  This course introduces students to the basic tools in macroeconomics.  Upon learning the basics, the students are exposed to deeper discussions of issues which include but not limited to unemployment and inflation, government budget deficits, exchange rates, the open economy and other current policy concerns.

Pre-requisite: ECONONE




MARKET1           Principles of Marketing

3 units
This course covers the principles and basic concepts of Marketing.  Primary emphasis is made on the four basic elements of Marketing (the Marketing mix) – Product, Price, Placement, and Promotion.  The concepts as well as its application in Philippine industry and market are discussed.  Students are encouraged to prepare a simple marketing program and develop a hypothetical product for presentation at the end of the term as a result of all the class lessons.

Prerequisite: MANAORG



SPEECOM          Oral Communication / Advanced Speech Class
3 units
This course is an English for Specific Purposes (ESP) course that focuses on the production, delivery, and assessment of the following oral presentations: the impromptu, lecture and/or persuasive speech for individual presentation, and the panel discussion for group presentation. The presentations aim at providing students first-hand experiences in public speaking to develop their self-confidence and critical thinking in oral presentations addressing relevant social issues.

Prerequisite: ENGLCOM



SERVMGT           Service Management
3 units
This course introduces students to the systematic design and management of the service processes necessary to deliver a level of performance that consistently surpasses customers¿ expectations. It examines the philosophy, strategy and style of management that service organizations can use to gain competitive advantage.

Prerequisite: CPROBS1, MANAORG



TOTALQM          Total Quality Management
3 units
Total Quality Management (TQM), can be expressed as the total system design of structure, procedures, processes and resources needed to implement quality management. This course aims to provide an overall understanding of the principles of quality and process management, its benefits, and the necessary requirements needed to gain accreditation from quality certifying bodies. The course will also provide students with technical and qualitative tools for measuring and auditing quality as well as techniques employed by corporate and business managers in ensuring quality. Ethical and social implications of TQM decisions will also be tackled.

Pre-requisite: CPROBS2

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Department Courses

CSRGOVE           Corporate Social Responsibility and Good Governance
3 units
This course discusses the pressing global issue of poverty and sustainable development. This encompasses the basic issue of business ethics and moves into environmental management. It also addresses the issue of resource and wealth imbalance. The course discusses the on-going debate as sustainable development abuts on the issue of free trade. It also serves as a venue to provide ideological and practical solutions at the micro and macro level.

Prerequisite: MANAORG



MANAORG          Management of Organizations
3 units
This is an introductory course on the theory and practice of management of organizations.  The objective is to help students think critically about management from different perspectives, i.e., mainstream and multi-stream approaches, to better understand and help resolve current management issues.  The course encourages students to consider the importance of values in applying the basic management functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling.

Prerequisite :  None



HUMANBE          Human Behavior in Organization
3 units
This course introduces the students to the theories, concepts, models, and dynamics of human behavior in organizations.  The course enables students to apply these theoretical foundations on small, medium, and large scale organizations as well as to other types of significant organizations in the country.

Prerequisite: MANAORG



STRATEG            Strategic Management
3 units
This is an integrating course, which exposes students to the basic nature and character of top management decision-making. Students get involved in the formulation and analysis of corporate strategies and policies. It provides the opportunity to link basic concepts and techniques learned from the various functional areas to see how it fits from a total corporate viewpoint.

Prerequisite:  BASFIN2, MANAORG

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ACM Courses

BCOMACM         Business Communication for APC Majors
3 units
Seven C’s of Communication. This course uses the Seven C’s framework for communication, which is: clear, concise, concrete, correct, coherent, complete, and courteous.

Prerequisite: ENGLCOM



BEHAACM          Behavioral Sciences for ACM

3 units
BEHAACM is a foundational course for students majoring in Applied Corporate Management. The course orients students to the Socio-Anthropological perspectives and methods of examining and understanding human behavior. It discusses basic concepts relevant to the study of society and culture, including the primary components of social structure and organizations; the types and functions of social institutions; and the dynamics of societal processes and social change. The course relates its concepts, perspectives and methods with applied corporate management.

Prerequisite: None



HUREONE           HR Planning, Recruitment, Selection, Training and Development
3 units
This course delves into the human resource management functions of planning, recruitment, and selection, as well as of employee training and development. The course presents the various theories, practices and development. The course presents the various theories, practices, and practical application of the theories related to these two operative functions of HRM. A strategic approach is taken to emphasize the important role of HRM in gain competitive advantage in the era of 21st globalization.

Prerequisite: HUMABEH



HURETWO          Industrial Relations and Compensation Administration
3 units
HURETWO is the dynamics of industrial/labor relations and compensations administration. It examines the theories, practices, issues and practical application of the various theoretical foundations related to labor relations and compensation administration. Moreover, the course will also focus on the comparative analysis of the operative functions of HRM as practiced in different Philippine industries and in other countries.

Prerequisite: HUREONE, PRCACM1



LBYAPC1             Advanced Desktop Application
3 units
This is a course for business management students to introduce the basic computer concepts. This course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of information technology and its importance to business environment.

Prerequisite: None



LBYAPC2             Business Intelligence
3 units
This is an advanced computer course for students to gain expert level competence of Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint.

Prerequisite: LBYAPC1



MAREACM             Management Research for APC Students
3 units
This course focuses on the research process in an organizational setting. It involves the use of practical examples and skill building techniques to provide a solid grounding in the planning and implementation of a research project that is meant to aid managers in decision-making.

Prerequisites : MANARES, DECACM1, MANAORG



ORGLEADLeadership in Organization
3 units
This course is a 3-unit elective offered to any business student who has the interest to know more about evolving philosophies on leadership. It is taught at DLSU because we recognize that our students are destined to become leaders in their organizations whether these are profit, non-profit, or governmental institutions operating within a community, region or nation. We find that it is our moral obligation to help our future leaders to understand what it means to lead in the 21st century.

Prerequisite: MANAORG



PRCAPM1             Management Practicum 1
3 units
PRCAPM1 is the first practicum course of APC students, which is usually taken during the First Trimester of their third year in college. Students intern full time in any of the major functional areas of a company for 12 consecutive weeks, during which they receive mentoring from their company supervisor-mentors (supermentors) and guidance from their faculty advisers.  At the end of the course, they present what they have learned in a culminating activity that is attended by both the supermentor and the adviser.

Prerequisites: BASFIN2, BCOMACM, HUREONE, MARKET1



PRCAPM2             Management Practicum 2
3 units
PRCAPM2 is the second practicum course of APC students, which is usually taken during the Third Trimester of their third year in college. Students intern fulltime in any of the major functional areas of a company for 12 consecutive weeks, during which they receive mentoring from their company supervisor-mentors (supermentors) and guidance from their faculty advisers. At the end of the course, they present what they have learned in a culminating activity that is attended by both the supermentor and the adviser.

Prerequisites: PRCAPM1



PRCAPM3             Management Practicum 3
3 units
PRCAPM3 is the third and final practicum course of APC students, which is usually taken during the Second Trimester of their fourth year in college. Students intern full time in any of the major functional areas of a company for 12 consecutive weeks, during which they receive mentoring from their company supervisor-mentors (supermentors) and guidance from their faculty advisers. At the end of the course, they present what they have learned in a culminating activity that is attended by both the supermentor and the adviser.

Prerequisite: PRCAPM2



THSAPC1           Thesis Course (Proposal) for APC Majors
3 units
This course is a pre-final requirement for students in the Applied Corporate Management (APC) program, during which they must complete and defend a thesis proposal that focuses on a particular business-related problem or concern.

Pre-requisite: MANARES, PRCACM2



THSAPC2             Thesis Course (Defense) for APC Majors
3 units
This course is the final requirement for students in the Applied Corporate Management (APC) program, during which they must complete and defend a thesis that focuses on a particular business-related problem or concern.

Pre-requisite: THSAPC1

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Electives

ACM students are to take five 3-unit courses as electives of the program (ACMELE1, ACMELE2, ACMELE3, ACMELE4, ACMELE5). Students may take any elective offered by other departments within and outside the College, provided they meet the pre-requisites.

 

SUSTORG                  Sustainable Organizations
Corporate Sustainability, as an integral part of Corporate Social Responsiveness, is the 21st century leaders’ competitive edge. Deep concern has gripped many business leaders with the unquestionable truth that all of us are currently consuming the earth’s resources in such rapid and irresponsible manner that we are leaving nothing to our future generations. The move to arrest ecological deterioration is beyond governments. Thus, industry has taken part of the cudgel to abate, if not reverse, the consequences of economic development. This course prepares young minds to be at the forefront of inescapable leadership issues. It takes the basics of Leadership in Organization with the basics of Corporate Social Responsiveness in the light of the Green economy. Thus, the course integrates the concepts of ecological sustainability, economic sustainability, and social sustainability

Prerequisite: MANAORG

 

INTERBU International Business
This course enables students to develop critical thinking in the analysis of the international business environment and various aspects of international businesses. IT fosters social responsibility in the pursuit of international business.

Prerequisite: STRATEG

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De La Salle University (DLSU) is a premier Catholic university in the Philippines. DLSU is a hundred-year-old university that started a systemic reform in 2002–2003 by revising its General Education Curriculum (GE) because, according to Maridable (2006), the first GE in 1996–1997 “had to be modified in order to address the observed problems that DLSU students seemed to lack the basic competencies needed to compete in the world” and the second is to “be responsive to the changing requirements of an emerging knowledge society in globalizing environment.” Maridable (2006) also points out that from February 2003 until 2006–2007, the General Education Committee (GEC) discussed the contents as well as the pedagogical framework of the Lasallian Core Curriculum (LCC). The GEC proposed the LCC with the publication of a Preamble “describing revised expectations of students and guidelines for the General Education Curriculum (GEC)” (Committee on Lasallian Pedagogical Framework, 2003). The proposed Preamble states that:

The DLSU General Education Curriculum is a set of foundational, formative, and integrative courses intended to inculcate in students a critical appreciation of the diverse fields of human knowledge, their principles and science, and their arts and methods of inquiry. The ultimate goal of the DLSU GEC is to produce in students a nationalistic and humanistic outlook and the development of a carefully reasoned adult faith in the Lasallian tradition (charism), which promotes human flourishing and inspires dedicated service to God and the Filipino nation, especially by helping the marginalized members of our society (DLSU General Education Committee, 2003, p.1).

Before the implementation of the LCC in school year 2005–2006, there was a massive training of faculty members and administrators to review and revise their curricula. These trainings included the discussion of the Lasallian Guiding Principles (LGP). These principles enumerate what qualities the Philippine Lasallian Family wants in a member of its community, and these are to be a “critical and creative thinker, effective communicator, reflective and lifelong learner, and service-driven citizen” (ASIST, n.d.).

Transformative framework: alignment of assessment and standards

In 2005, DLSU adopted the transformative framework to align standards, instruction, and assessment (Committee on Lasallian Pedagogical Framework, 2005). This committee presented the pedagogical framework in a document that was given during the training of faculty members. This document points out that “Teachers will need to understand the framework's focus on transformative learning and its view of the nature of knowledge, the teaching and learning process, the role of the teacher, classroom management, and assessment” (Committee on Lasallian Pedagogical Framework, 2005).

The DLSU Transformative Learning Framework (TL) explains the shift from the transmissive to the transformative learning framework, where in the former, the students are assumed to be sponges waiting to absorb what their teachers are going to give them, while in the latter, the students are assumed to possess prior knowledge that teachers have to uncover, so they can design instructions to help students discover their misconceptions and deepen their understanding of the lesson. In the transmissive mode of teaching, knowledge is a “set of given truths” as opposed to the transformative teaching’s definition of knowledge as “students’ conceptual growth and change” (ASIST website, n.d.). However, in the TL framework, the teacher is the facilitator guiding students in knowledge construction as they go through the process of inquiry. Consequently, assessment is authentic and performance-based rather than paper-and-pencil-based as the former measures higher order thinking skills and ELGA or Expected Lasallian Graduate Attributes.

Transformative learning syllabus writing seminar: ensuring coherence of ELGA and assessment

In order to achieve coherence of the ELGA and assessment as well as instruction, the DLSU Faculty Development Program for 2011–2012 aims to:
  1. 1.

    review, revise, and/or update existing GE courses syllabi;

     

  2. 2.

    review, revise, and/or update major courses syllabi;

     

  3. 3.

    train faculty in the development of modules for GE and major subjects; and

     

  4. 4.

    train faculty in module construction (Faculty Development Program, 2011)

     

The training for the syllabus review and revision of GE syllabi included a review of the rationale of the TL as well as a review of the backward design. This was followed by activities intended to transform faculty members’ knowledge of matching ELGA and learning outcomes in their syllabus. The training also provided a template of the syllabus with 10 parts.
  1. 1.

    Preliminary information such as course code, college, department, class days, and instructor information

     

  2. 2.

     

  3. 3.

     

  4. 4.

     

  5. 5.

     

  6. 6.

    Other requirements and assessments

     

  7. 7.

     

  8. 8.

    Learning plan-calendar matching learning outcomes and learning activities

     

  9. 9.

    References in APA or MLA and publication date from 2006 up

     

  10. 10.

     

The administrators such as college deans and department chairpersons were also trained in 2010 through The Lasallian Learning Leaders Congress, which aimed to:
  1. 1.

    Explain the connection of the Lasallian Guiding Principles with their educational philosophies, school’s vision mission and GE curriculum.

     

  2. 2.

    Gain insights into how the curriculum can be designed “backward” for “deep understanding” and transferring authentic learning skills and tasks that are essential in real and adult life.

     

  3. 3.

    Develop an action plan for using key elements of Schooling by Design and Understanding by Design in the GE curriculum, programs, syllabus, and learning modules (Lasallian Learning Leaders Congress handout).

     

Professional development of teachers is supported by an office called DLSU Academic Support for Instructional Support and Technology (ASIST). It has four tracks: Lasallian Education, GE Curriculum, Contemporary Pedagogy, and Using Educational Multimedia Technologies (ASIST, 2012). ASIST has a website that is divided into four sections corresponding to the four tracks. Each track has downloadable references and templates. For example, the Lasallian Education section has the Lasallian Guiding Principles of Education, while the section on Curriculum has templates and sample syllabi as well as other references for writing the learning outcomes. It also has a Transformative Learning Module in beta. This allows any faculty member to plan, write, revise, and upload their modules on the ASIST website.

In addition, DLSU’s Institutional Testing and Evaluation Office (ITEO) has carried out five research projects to help in systemic reform in DLSU:
  1. (1)

    development of faculty evaluation forms for TL classes, (2) evaluation of the implementation of a TL program, (3) a descriptive study of TL faculty, (4) development of rubrics for TL classes, and (5) development and validation of the DLSU Thinking Skills Test (Valladolid, 2010, p. 153).

     

Valladolid (2010) reports that during school year 2005–2006, ITEO revised, piloted, and evaluated the TL teacher evaluation. This evaluation instrument consisted of four assessment areas: “student learning process, teacher’s work, students’ learning environment, and assessment of student learning.” These assessment areas correspond to the aspects of Transformative Learning (Valladolid, 2010).

As can be seen in the results above, the vision for all students was the guiding force for systemic reform in curriculum and assessment. This vision resulted in the Expected Lasallian Graduate Attributes (ELGA). The attributes are put into each syllabus and the learning outcomes per course are matched with these outcomes. These outcomes are stated in terms of a product or demonstration that can be assessed. DLSU has implemented systemic reform by aligning the vision for students, the General Education curriculum, standards and assessment through syllabus writing and teacher development. In addition, ITEO has also aligned the teacher evaluation process with the Transformative Learning framework. Finally, mechanisms for collaboration were used for the General Education Committee as well as the Transformative Pedagogical Framework Committee. The consensus-building process continued as these committees presented their documents and solicited faculty feedback before the full implementation of systemic reform. Mechanisms for inquiry and reflection were set by the ITEO through research and development of instruments for teacher evaluation.

ENGLCOM syllabus revision: aligning standards and assessment

The second part of the study documents the process of aligning the university’s pedagogical framework and the English 1 syllabus in Department of English and Applied Linguistics (DEAL). English 1 or ENGLCOM is a six-unit course divided into two components: Reading/Language (RLC) and Writing (WC). This set-up started in 2010–2011, and each component has a different teacher. Each class meets two times a week for one and a half hours. However, with the expansion of literacy and the move to revise the syllabus so that it is aligned with the mission and vision of the University, English 1 was revised in March 2012 following a collaborative and consultative process. The team agreed that there were three changes that the revised syllabus must have: the learning outcomes must be aligned with the ELGA or the Expected Lasallian Graduate Attribute, the tasks must be aligned with the multiliteracies framework, and the tasks for the Reading/Viewing/Language Component are to be aligned with the tasks in the Writing Component.

The study has found that DEAL followed the first two stages used by Duong et al. (2011). These two stages were drafting and panelling. Drafting and panelling followed five steps: First, the key performance areas were identified. The researcher as coordinator of ENGLCOM drafted the list after attending the Transformative Framework Syllabus Writing Workshop. Second, the draft was presented to two core members of the ENGLCOM committee members in order to review and refine the list. Third, the revised draft was emailed to 60 Department of English and Applied Linguistics (DEAL) faculty members for feedback, and after this, the researcher consolidated the feedback in order to revise the syllabus. This second version was then reviewed once more by the core committee members. The fifth stage was the focus group discussion where all teachers teaching ENGLCOM reviewed and refined the final learning outcomes. The assessment and instruction plans in the syllabus also went through the same process.

ENGLCOM syllabus revision: aligning ELGA, learning outcomes, and assessment

The multiliteracy framework was used as a basis for the researcher’s review of the current syllabus. The 2011 ENGLCOM syllabus in Table 1 shows that despite the inclusion of the word “media” in the course description, the learning outcomes still focus on the traditional meaning of literacy with emphasis on reading and writing of printed texts. In addition, it does not separate the learning outcomes for the Reading/Language component and Writing Component which are taught by two different teachers. Moreover, it does not specify the learning outcomes in terms of performance tasks that can be assessed. Faculty members who participated in this study pointed out that the absence of clear outcomes created differences in the way teachers taught and assessed students.
For these reasons, the ENGLCOM committee was prompted to revise the syllabus in February 2012. Table 2 shows that viewing skills are assumed to be important in order for students to become engaged citizens, and writing a brochure is added in the Reading and Language Component learning outcome for the media literacy assessment. It can also be observed that the learning outcomes in this version closely relate to the Expected Lasallian Graduate Attribute (ELGA) of service-driven citizens. This draft was reviewed and approved by two other core members of the ENGLCOM committee.

This draft was emailed to all 60 faculty members of the Department of English and Applied Linguistics for panelling. However, only 12 faculty members returned their comments. The table below shows the summary of the feedback. The common concerns were about the brochure and the critique. Eight respondents expressed their uncertainty regarding the production of a brochure. For example, one faculty member said that

I teach technical writing in another school. The brochure is one of the requirements…If we require a brochure in ENGLCOM, I think we would have to discuss with students the elements and principles of design, and purpose and contents of a brochure. We also need to discuss with them what is technical writing and how it differs from other types of writing.

Some suggested that writing a position paper or a critique of a movie could be better than producing a brochure. On the other hand, four faculty members asked for clarification regarding the type of article that ENGLCOM students would critique. Other issues were related to the extent of the learning outcomes. Examples are given below:

Dr. A.: “I believe in the saying that Less is MORE; thus, in my opinion, we should keep the current content of ENGLCOM…”

Ms. R.: “Could we add a statement reflective of action (service)?”

Dr. G.: “May I suggest that the specific component be indicated for the required outputs.”

These feedbacks were taken into consideration in the revision of the learning outcomes. The third version in Table 3 shows that the word “multiliterate” is now incorporated as an overall goal of the course. The Core Committee agreed that academic literacy, media/visual literacy, and cultural literacy were needed to expand the traditional literacy of reading and writing in ENGLCOM and to help freshman students to become better 21st century learners and citizens. It was agreed that academic literacy meant the ability to use academic conventions in writing essays, academic reading strategies for printed and online texts, and metacognition through reflection. This was translated in the Reading and Language Component Learning Outcome 1 and 4 as well as in WC Learning Outcomes 1–4. On other hand, the Core Committee adapted the NAMLE (National Association for Media Literary Educators) definition “media literacy is seen to consist of a series of communication competencies, including the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, and communicate information in a variety of forms, including print and non-print messages” (Baran 2012). This was translated in RVLC Learning Outcomes 1 and 2 and in WC Learning Outcome 1. Finally, the core committee agreed that freshman students need to develop cultural literacy by understanding their own culture and issues related to it. This translated to WC Learning Outcome 2.
The focus group discussion also finalized the other requirements and the grading system. The group also finalized the calendar of activities showing the alignment of the tasks and topics for reading/viewing, language, and writing. An example is shown in Table 4. These results suggest that aligning the vision for students with learning outcomes and assessment seems like walking on a tight rope, with the ELGA and learning outcomes that the leader had in mind on one hand, and the expected learning outcomes that each faculty member had in mind on the other. The balance between the two can be a messy process that can be organized through collaboration and consensus-building activities. It can be observed that the leader was there to facilitate the discussion and to allow different points of view to come into the fore. When the multiliteracy-anchored syllabus was presented to the faculty during the annual DEAL Planning, there were no questions or objections, unlike the heated discussions that took place the previous year when the process for consensus-building was not followed.