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Student Case Study Formats

Now that you’re in college, your professor will likely assume that you know how to write a variety of different writing assignments. Many courses required for certain degrees will require students to write a case study every now and then. What? Never had a write a case study? Need a case study definition? No problem! Here’s a basic case study definition: a thorough investigation of a problem. A case study can also be referred to as a case study analysis—however, the case study definition remains the same. You may be wondering how to write a case study. If you’ve never had to write a case study before, don’t worry. All the key information you need to know regarding how to write a case study is below!

What? Never had a write a case study? Need a case study definition? No problem!

Here’s a basic case study definition: a thorough investigation of a problem. A case study can also be referred to as a case study analysis — however, the case study definition remains the same. You may be wondering how to write a case study. If you’ve never had to write a case study before, don’t worry. All the key information you need to know regarding how to write a case study is below!

Contents

What is a Case Study?

Now that you know a clear case study definition, it’s time to learn what is a case study. Specifically, we’ll review the different areas that a case study should include. Writing a case study doesn’t need to be difficult. In fact, once you know a case study template and review a few case study examples, you’ll be ready to tackle whatever case study topic your business teacher assigns. So, for students wondering what is a case study, here’s the detailed answer.

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A case study (or case study analysis) involves researching a business problem, examining several possible solutions, and concluding which solution would be the most effective based on presented evidence. A case study is based in the real world; this means that the problem being researched will be one that real companies face. When writing a case study it’s important to research relevant and reliable resources.

Think about magazines, journals, reports, and online databases that offer important insights and access. Worried about how to write a case study? Don’t be! There are many free case study examples and case study templates online to help students navigate their way through this type of academic writing assignment. If you don’t want to be the student asking how to write a case study in class, check out these helpful hints regarding writing a case study.

Writing a Case Study

Writing a case study takes a bit of preparation. If you’ve never written a case study, let’s answer the question “How to write a case study?” right now: with preparation. Writing a case study takes a lot of research. Research that has to be approached with all the attention to the detail.  Just as when you write a research paper, make sure to outline to find relevant sources of information. Before beginning to write a case study, you’ll need to do a bit of investigative work. First, review the case assigned by your professor critically.

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Thoroughly check the case study for key details, important facts, and relevant problems. Next, depending upon the type of problem presented in the case study, select two or more problems and brainstorm why they existed, how they affected the company, and what party was responsible for their creation. Third, brainstorm possible solutions to the problems. Finally, propose the best solution and support your case study analysis with strong evidence. A key aspect of writing a case study is evaluating the chosen solution; in other words, would this solution realistically work in the real world?

Case Study Format

The internet offers a variety of case study format options, but typically a widely accepted case study format will follow these guidelines. Begin with an introduction which identifies the problem and provides relevant background details about the company.

Next, the body of the case study should focus on the analysis of the possible solutions. Each solution should be accompanied by analysis including the pros and cons of the solution. Finally, the writer should decide upon the best alternative and defend it with strong evidence. This multi-paragraph analysis section should include evidence from journals, articles, and/or online databases as well as texts from class, and personal experience if appropriate.

Case Study Examples

Because of the academic nature of writing a case study, many colleges and universities have created case study formats to help students by posting case study examples online. Need a bit of extra help to understand a good case study template based on your assigned case study? Don’t worry! Here are a few great case study examples so you don’t need to wonder how to write a case study to meet your professor’s expectations. The provided business case study samples cover all the academic guidelines and can be used as a perfect example of case study writing.

As with any academic writing assignment, it’s important to get started early. With HandmadeWritings, you can forget about other assignments, because we easily can provide any homework help. Don’t fall into the trap of procrastination and think that you know how to write a case study and that it will be easy. Writing a case study can be easy if you leave yourself enough time—don’t wait until the last minute!

Good case study examples show a high amount of research and analysis in the final draft. Fortunately, many colleges and universities offer an example of a case study online for students. However, these case study examples can be accessed by students worldwide so if your higher education institution doesn’t offer a case study template online, simply find a good case study example and bookmark it for quick reference when writing your case study.

By now, you know how to write a case study. You also know a clear case study definition to get you started on the right path. Review available case study examples and case study templates and you’ll earn the A you deserve!

Guides

Remember your observation notes should provide the following detailed information about the child:

  • child’s age,
  • physical appearance,
  • the setting, and
  • any other important background information.

You should observe the child a minimum of 5 hours. Make sure you DO NOT use the child's real name in your observations. Always use a pseudo name for course assignments. 

You will use your observations to help write your narrative. When submitting your observations for the course please make sure they are typed so that they are legible for your instructor. This will help them provide feedback to you. 

Qualitative Observations

A qualitative observation is one in which you simply write down what you see using the anecdotal note format listed below. 

Quantitative Observations

A quantitative observation is one in which you will use some type of checklist to assess a child's skills. This can be a checklist that you create and/or one that you find on the web. A great choice of a checklist would be an Ounce Assessment and/or work sampling assessment depending on the age of the child. Below you will find some resources on finding checklists for this portion of the case study. If you are interested in using Ounce or Work Sampling, please see your program director for a copy. 

Remaining Objective 

For both qualitative and quantitative observations, you will only write down what your see and hear. Do not interpret your observation notes. Remain objective versus being subjective.

An example of an objective statement would be the following: "Johnny stacked three blocks vertically on top of a classroom table." or "When prompted by his teacher Johnny wrote his name but omitted the two N's in his name." 

An example of a subjective statement would be the following: "Johnny is happy because he was able to play with the block." or "Johnny omitted the two N's in his name on purpose."